Delicious Israel: a special food tour in Tel Aviv

The first day I stepped into Israel, I fell in love it. Its large, golden Telavivian beaches, the friendly and amazing people, the vibrant atmosphere and, of course, the tasty food.
Before my trip, I did some research on what I could visit and do, and my expectations grew and grew the more I was browsing the web. Apparently, Tel Aviv is a heaven for all vegans and vegetarians. In fact, 10% of the population have made this ethical choice. I felt incredibly lucky, mainly because I had turned vegetarian five years ago and life is not always easy when travelling.

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It goes without saying that one of the best ways to learn about different cultures is to taste the typical food, and trust me… I ate a lot! I tried something new every day and I also had traditional Friday dinner at a friend’s house. I went to several restaurants and bars, and I learnt more thanks to a specific food tour around in Tel Aviv.

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Beautiful view of Tel Aviv

I knew about Delicious Israel through my online research. I contacted them and we decided on the best tour for me according to my interests: Eat Tel Aviv. They offer several food-related tours both in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, including private ones. Eat Tel Aviv is the perfect balance between food, city history and a exploring the city on foot through the most charming neighbourhoods of Tel Aviv.

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Jaffa – Tel Aviv

I was very excited to take part in a different activity and turned out amazing! For this reason, I want to share my experience with you. A piece of advice: don’t have breakfast as you will  eat a lot during your visit!

I met my guide, Ilana, in the picturesque ancient neighbourhood called Jaffa. Our group was multicultural and small enough to appreciate every single explanation, to get to know each other and enjoy ourselves.

Ilana introduced herself by telling us her family background. Like most Jewish folks, the cultures can be very different even in the same family: mom and dad’s side found “within the kitchen walls” was the best way to communicate and overcome linguistic barriers.

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Jaffa – Tel Aviv

She also shared many interesting food-related anecdotes: my favourite was about a type of date that is called medjool. The man who decided to import it to Israel didn’t know the specific name, so asked a Bedouin how this fruit was called and he answered “Medjool”. The man thought he finally had found the name of the date. However, what the Beduin actually said literally meant “I don’t know”. The Medjool dates are still known like this nowadays…

Ilana had many other interesting stories, and this is something hard to find in guides. Her stories varied from food culture to the history of the city.

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Jaffa: starting point of our tour

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Jaffa, Tel Aviv

What food do you imagine when you think of Israel? I’m sure that the first dishes that come to your mind are hummus and falafel, but there’s much more to taste, and I learnt a lot thanks to this tour which stimulated all my five senses.

The tour followed the path and the history of the first inhabitants of Tel Aviv, and the neighbourhoods in which they later spread to. People initially settled down in Jaffa, the oldest port of Israel, and the most ancient area of Tel Aviv. In front of the port, there are maps nestled into the ground which show the distances and original cities of the communities who arrived and settled in Jaffa.

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One of the maps

Exporting shamuti oranges became the main trade thanks to the excellent quality of the citrus which were grown using farming methods traditionally employed by Arabs until the 19th century; also lemons and mandarins were produced and exported in smaller quantities.

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Jaffa, Tel Aviv

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Jaffa, Tel Aviv

Once the community in Jaffa grew significantly, the population moved to different areas, such as Neve Tzedek and eventually the Carmel Market, which also coincides with the final destination of our tour.

The tour started with the tasting of the most remarkable dish of Israel: hummus. This chickpea cream is so famous that it’s one of the stereotypes of the country, and it’s widely appreciated by tourists too. Hummus is so important that it’s the only food to have its own verb: לנגב (lenagev) to wipe. You don’t eat hummus, you wipe hummus!

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Different kinds of hummus

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Hummus, pita bread and onions

Later, we stopped in the oldest Abulafia bakery to have some special bread with herbs, followed by a dessert called malabi in one small bar in the Jaffa Market. Malabi is a sort of light pudding made of milk (animal or plant-based), syrup, granola and grated coconut. It melted in my mouth. I tried the dairy and the vegan version and were both delicious.

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Malabi

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Different kinds of bread with herbs

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On our way from Jaffa to Neve Tzedek

The tour continued towards Neve Tzedek, the first Jewish neighbourhood in Tel Aviv built outside the old port of Jaffa where the Mizrahi and Yemenite Jewish initially settled. Nowaways, Neve Tzedek is one of the fanciest areas of the city with an evident European influence in styles and architecture. Have you ever thought of mixing French croissant dough and halva, the Israeli sweets made of sesame? Give it a try!

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Street in Neve Tzedek

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Elegant bakery in Neve Tzedek

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Do you have a sweet tooth?

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Romantic garden in Neve Tzedek

The last part of the tour was in my favourite neighbourhood, the Carmel Market. I spent one entire week in Tel Aviv, and I believe that this is the best place to look for accommodation to thoroughly enjoy one’s stay in “the city that never stops”. It’s located at a walking distance from the beaches and the main streets of Tel Aviv.

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Carmel Market, Tel Aviv

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Carmel Market, Tel Aviv

Delicious Israel

Carmel Market, Tel Aviv

Originally founded by the Yemenite community (who still owns most of the houses which are passed down from generation to generation), the Carmel Market is now a hipster paradise with eccentric bars, a bustling market and an incredibly welcoming atmosphere. For these reasons, it became a popular area filled with expensive houses, hotels and Airbnb’s.

We had the chance to try more typical food such as falafel, Israeli craft beers, cookies, ice cream, and a unique Yemenite bread made by an exceptional lady in an exceptional restaurant.

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Unique tiny restaurant

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An exceptional lady in an exceptional restaurant

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Yemenite bread

I enjoyed every single thing I tasted, and I found all the curious details that our guide gave us incredibly interesting. Naturally, I’ve only shared a small part of all the information I gained with you: I don’t want to spoil the surprise, although I believe that words would never be enough. Food can’t be explained; food has to be savoured.

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The man of the cookies

Spices

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Vegan paradise

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Delicious ice cream made with goat cheese, pears, honey and pepper

different nationalities and cultures. This is probably one of the reasons why its food is so extraordinary.

I highly recommend this tour with Delicious Israel. I learnt so much, had a pleasant walking tour through the oldest and most fascinating neighbourhoods of Tel Aviv, and I tried out local specialities that I probably would never have tasted or known about if I was just travelling solo.

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Falafel

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Halva

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Any olive-lover?

What I particularly appreciated, is the fact that the guide took us to small, local places far away from the typical tourist traps. I discovered tiny family-run restaurants, sat in bars where locals sit, and felt as though I experienced something special and unique, so my money was well spent and I keep a beautiful memory.

 

10 Comments:

  1. I would LOVE this tour! I became pescatarian earlier this year, and it can be a struggle when traveling. All of this food looks amazing and what a cool story about the medjool dates! I’ve never knew that’s why they had that name! I honestly can’t pick one food from your post that I would like the most…they all sound so different and delicious!

    • I guess that being pescetarian is much much easier when travelling especially in some amazing sea destinations in the Mediterranean, but it’s a process of getting used to new lifestyles. 😉 Yes, all the food there was amazing… I had to try it all!

  2. Wow food looks so tempting. Never knew Is real is so beautiful. Thanks for sharing

  3. Middle Eastern food is absolutely delicious!! I love their breads and use of olives. I love hummous and your picture of the Yemenite bread makes me want to have some right now!

    • The Yemenite bread is enriched with eggs and it’s absolutely amazing, especially when served with some tasty (unknown for me) sauces…
      I liked every kind of food I tried here in Israel. You can imagine well, how this place can be a heaven for vegetarians like me.

  4. A food tour is my kind of tour! Carbs are my weakness and all of those bread photos has my mouth watering!

  5. What a great post! I’m Assyrian, and we eat a lot of the same foods. I love the pics and the explanations to go with them. A visit to Israel is definitely on my bucket list. Thanks for sharing!

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